Grove Veterinary Clinic recommends these vaccines for puppies, dogs, kittens and cats.

Vaccination Recomendations

Vaccination Recommendations for Puppies and Adult Dogs

There are many different vaccines available for dogs and puppies.  There are several vaccinations that we routinely give to puppies and dogs.  Through discussion and evaluation of your dog’s lifestyle, we will make specific vaccine recommendations for your individual dog.  We do not vaccinate for the sake of vaccination; we only use vaccines that we believe in and vaccines that we feel are safe and effective for your canine companions.

Grove Veterinary Clinic follows the canine vaccination guidelines outlined by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Canine Vaccine Task Force.  Based upon these guidelines, we have grouped the vaccines into “core” and “optional” categories.

Core Vaccines for our Canine Patients:

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies is a disease that is transmitted from the bite of an infected animal.  Any warm-blooded animal is capable of becoming rabid, but the bat is the primary carrier in the Pacific Northwest.  Signs of rabies include changes in behavior (i.e. aggressive behaviors or blunted mental status), seizures, coma, or any other neurologic signs.  Rabies vaccine can be given as early as 12 weeks of age.  The vaccine is boostered 1 year after that and then boostered every 3 years.  This vaccine is extremely important due the severity of this disease; it is 100% fatal and there is no cure.  Additionally, it is a public health concern, as people can get this deadly disease.

DHPP Vaccination
This vaccination protects against a combination of diseases that infect dogs.  The viral diseases from which we seek to protect dogs with this vaccine include the following:

Canine Distemper Virus (D)
his is a viral disease transmitted by aerosolization of infective droplets.  It can cause neurologic disease, respiratory complications, conjunctivitis, seizures, and death..

Infectious Canine Hepatitis (H)
This is a viral disease that is shed in the urine and feces and is picked up through the oral mucosa and nasal cavity.  It can cause fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, coughing, and lethargy.

Parainfluenza Virus (P)
This is a virus transmitted by aerosolization.  It is part of the kennel cough disease complex and will often cause coughing.

Parvovirus (P)
This is a viral disease that causes severe bloody diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, and anorexia.  Since the virus will also attack a patient’s bone marrow, immunosupression and sepsis can result.  Puppies and dogs can die from parvovirus infection.  It is shed in the feces of infected animals and can persist in the environment for months to years.

This combination vaccine is typically started when a puppy is 8-9 weeks of age.  Each puppy will receive a booster of this vaccine every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks of age.  A booster vaccine is then given 1 year after the final vaccine in the puppy series.  After that, it is recommended that dogs be vaccinated with DHPP vaccine every 3 years.

Optional (Non-Core) Vaccines for our Canine Patients:

By optional or non-core, we mean that not all dogs will need to receive the following vaccines. 

Bordetella (Kennel Cough)
This is a bacterial disease that is part of the kennel cough disease complex.  Animals with the disease will often present with a cough.  The vaccine is recommended for dogs and puppies that are boarded in kennels, groomed in professional grooming facilities, participating in puppy or obedience classes, frequenting pet stores, or attending dog shows.  This vaccine requires a yearly vaccination booster.  If a puppy receives a bordetella vaccine before turning 16 weeks of age, the vaccine will need to be boostered 3-4 weeks later.

Leptospirosis Vaccination
This is a bacterial disease that is shed in the urine and other bodily secretions.  The spirochete bacterium can be found in streams, rivers, standing water.  Leptospirosis infection can affect the liver and the kidneys and can be a fatal disease.  It is also a zoonotic disease, meaning people can get this disease from infected animals.  It is not a common canine infection in our area.

Lyme Disease (Borrelia burgdorerei) Vaccination
This is a disease transmitted by deer ticks.  Clinical signs include fever, lethargy, and joint pain.  This disease has not been documented in our area, so the vaccine is not routinely given at Grove Veterinary Clinic.  However, if your dog is travelling to an endemic area for the disease, we do recommend vaccination against lyme disease.

Vaccination Recommendations for Kittens and Adult Cats

There are many different vaccines available for cats and kittens.  There are only 3 different vaccinations that we give to cats and not all cats will receive all of these vaccinations.  Through discussion and evaluation of your cat’s lifestyle, we will make specific vaccine recommendations for your individual cat(s).  We do not vaccinate for the sake of vaccination; we only use vaccines that we believe in and vaccines that we feel are safe and effective for your feline companions.

Grove Veterinary Clinic follows the feline vaccination guidelines outlined by the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP).  Based upon these guidelines, we have grouped the vaccines into “core” and “optional” categories.

Core Vaccines for our Feline Patients:

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies is a disease that is transmitted from the bite of an infected animal.  Any warm-blooded animal is capable of becoming rabid, but the bat is the primary carrier in the Pacific Northwest.  Signs of rabies include changes in behavior (i.e. aggressive behaviors or blunted mental status), seizures, coma, or any other neurologic signs.  Rabies vaccine can be given as early as 12 weeks of age.  The vaccine is boostered annually after that.  This vaccine is extremely important due the severity of this disease; it is 100% fatal and there is no cure.  Additionally, it is a public health concern, as people can get this deadly disease.  We use the Merial Purevax Feline Rabies Vaccine, which is the safest feline rabies vaccination available.

FVRCP Vaccination
This vaccination protects against a combination of diseases that affect cats.  The viral diseases from which we seek to protect cats with this vaccine include the following:

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (Herpesvirus) (FVR)
The feline herpesvirus is transmitted by aerosolization and in utero, thus it is an extremely contagious.  It usually causes ocular and nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, corneal ulcerations (keratitis), sneezing, fever, and inappetance. 

Feline Calicivirus (C)
The feline calicivirus is shed from oral and nasal secretions, as well as in the feces.  It can persist on contaminated objects.  It can cause nasal dischange, sneezing, fever, oral ulcerations, gingivitis, conjunctivits, canine tooth extrusion, vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and inappetance.

Feline Panleukopenia (P)
This parvovirus is shed in bodily excretions and secretions and can be transmitted in utero.  Clinical signs can include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, neurological signs, and bone marrow suppression.

This combination vaccine is typically started when a kitten is 8-9 weeks of age.  Each kitten will receive a booster of this vaccine every 3-4 weeks until the kitten is 16 weeks of age.  A booster vaccine is then given 1 year after the final vaccine in the kitten series.  After that, it is recommended that the vaccine be given every 3 years. 

Optional (Non-Core) Vaccine for our Feline Patients:

Feline Leukemia Vaccination
This is the only optional, or non-core, vaccination that we offer at Grove Veterinary Clinic.  By optional, we mean that not all cats will need to be vaccinated against Feline Leukemia.  It is typically recommended to those cats that spend any time outdoors or to those indoor cats that live with other cats that go outside.  

The virus is spread by infected cats through bite wounds (fighting), grooming, or other types of contact.  This virus damages a cat’s immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and cancers throughout the cat’s body.  There is no cure for this disease.  Prevention of infection is the key.

This vaccine can be given to a kitten as early as 8-9 weeks of age; a booster is given in 3-4 weeks and then the vaccine is given yearly after that.  Kittens and cats should be tested for the infection before the vaccine is given.

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